DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-2902.isj20203793

Determination of severity of acute pancreatitis

Vijaykumar C. Bada

Abstract


Background: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process with a highly variable clinical course. The present study was conducted to assess severity of acute pancreatitis.

Methods: The present study was conducted on 53 patients of acute pancreatitis of both genders. A thorough clinical examination was performed. Ranson’s score (RS), Glasgow score (GS), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) score, APACHE-O score and Balthazar’s computed tomography severity index (CTSI) score was recorded.

Results: Out of 53 patients, males were 47 and females were 6. Patients were divided into acute pancreatitis (32) and severe pancreatitis (21). Results of the bivariate analysis of Ranson scoring system in mild periodontitis was 0.84 in severe was 2.95, Glasgow score was 0.66 in mild and 2.48 in severe, APACHE-II had 6.94 in mild and 10.33 in severe, APACHE-O had 7.34 in mild and 11 in severe and CTSI had 1.9 in mild and 6.15 in severe.

Conclusions: Authors found that all the scoring systems are useful in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.


Keywords


Acute pancreatitis, Severity, Glasgow

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References


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