DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-2902.isj20201864

Serum lactate as a prognostic marker in patients with sepsis: a prospective study

Suhas T. Shetty, Ramakant Balookar, Dayanand S. Biradar, M. B. Patil

Abstract


Background: A prospective study to estimate the serum lactate levels and as a prognostic marker in patients with sepsis.

Methods: 170 patients admitted with sepsis in B.L.D.E. (Deemed to be University) Shri. B. M. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Vijayapur from October 2014 to June 2016.

Results: In this study the mean serum lactate value of first sample in survivors (146 patients) is 3.8±1.2 and non-survivors (24 patients) is 6.2±1.9 with p value<0.001 which is significant. The serum lactate value of the second sample in survivors (146) is 2.7±1.0 and in non survivors (24) is 6.3±1.8 with p value<0.001 which is significant. The mean value of serum lactate 1st sample collected at the time of admission is 4.1±1.6 and the mean value of serum lactate second sample collected at 24 - 48 hours after admission is 3.1±1.6.

Conclusions: Lactate level more than 4 mmol/l, patients are at highest risk of mortality and an aggressive resuscitation strategy shall be warranted. Hence serum lactate is considered as an independent and significant prognostic marker in patients with sepsis and evaluates the treatment outcome.


Keywords


Prognostic marker, Sepsis, Serum lactate

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References


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